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mudcloth art 6

Remember when I brainstormed ideas for the hallway? I contemplated wallpaper and wainscoting to deemphasize the linen closet at the end of hallway. Well, I decided I can’t commit to wallpaper. The hallway is fairly narrow and I just feel like the sight lines (or lack thereof) would make things feel even more cramped and busy. Likewise, I think any type of added woodwork would emphasize all the different doors riddling the small space.

One reader suggested a built-in base cabinet with open shelving and/or cabinetry above to replace the linen closet. I absolutely LOVE the idea. It would create a more appealing focal point while still providing storage. I’m still mulling it over…a year later. (How awesome would it be to incorporate laundry-sorting organization into the base cabinet?!) In the meantime, I’ve made the executive decision to hang some stuff on the walls. I have no real plan, no layout in mind. I just want to display stuff I like. And I like Kuba cloth!

mudcloth art 1

I saved a pair of vintage Kuba textiles to my etsy favorites months ago. I couldn’t stop thinking about them. Thanks to some etsy gift cards from family last year and a Framebridge discount, I finally made them mine and had them custom framed. Once I received the textiles from the etsy seller, I simply went online to Framebridge, entered the approximate measurements of my textiles, chose the Mercer Slim frame sans mat along with the custom framing option and selected the mail-in option. I added special instructions to make the two frames the same size even though the textiles were slightly different in size so I would be able to display them together in a symmetrical layout. A few days later, a prepaid package arrived to send the textiles to Framebridge’s studio for framing. I sent them in and a few weeks later the framed Kuba cloth arrived. It was love at first sight.

mudcloth art 4

They were the perfect scale for a sliver of wall just outside the main bathroom. For a split second, I tried talking myself into hanging them somewhere more prominent that would be easier to photograph for the blog but then I realized how ridiculous that was. In real life, I wanted them in that little hallway. It would be stupid to hang them elsewhere just for a better photo op. I’m so happy I went with my gut…even though that lil’ hallway is crazy difficult to photograph. This is one of those times I wish you could experience my house in vivo. The new artwork is so much better in person and somehow it makes the hallway feel bigger.

mudcloth art 3

The other problem with photographing this area involves lighting. The main living area receives so much natural light that it’s almost impossible to capture the hallway art without completely blowing out the kitchen and living room. Again, I wish you could see them in person.

The new art looks amazing at night when the recessed lighting washes them in soft light. We purposefully installed offset lighting in the hallway to highlight the walls (not the floor). It’s a great trick we learned from our electrician.

mudcloth art 2

I’m impressed with the framing job. The frames are indeed the exact same size, per my instructions. The textiles are seemingly invisibly mounted or “floating” on a linen-like paper backdrop with no mat. There are no big wrinkles in the fabric, but I love that the natural, imperfect texture of the raffia is still evident from behind the glass.

The frames came complete with picture-hanging hardware (i.e., picture wire) already attached. I hung them myself. Thanks to all those calculus classes I had to take for my pharmacy degree, my math skills allowed me to get the placement right on the first try. However, every time I hang something on an interior wall, I am reminded of our decision to not gut the interior plaster walls and replace them with drywall. I’m all ready to go with my drywall anchor when I realize I’m working with plaster, not drywall. Grrrr. Oh well. Masonry anchors to the rescue!

mudcloth art 5

They’re really pretty to look at from the bathroom. Let’s be honest. 90% of the time I’m going to the bathroom with the door open, thanks to a very social three-year-old.

mudcloth art 7

If you’d like to give Framebridge a try, you can use the promo code HOUSETWEAKING at checkout to score 10% off your first purchase. I’m going to use the custom framing service to have one of Everett’s art pieces framed. I’ve been saving it since he was in kindergarten and it’s about time I put it on display.

Happy framing!

images: Dana Miller for House*Tweaking

53 Comments

19.February.2016

They look incredible Dana! Love the texture & oversized framing. I also never get to close the door when I ‘m in the washroom either…the joy of kids! Enjoy the weekend.

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19.February.2016

Love the texture of the fabric. After contemplating lots of blank walls in our new house, I’ve got a kimono, an antique obi and and a vintage Japanese hanging scroll on their way. The allure of them was the imperfections and the wonderful patterns and texture.

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replied on February 19th, 2016

And the stories behind them! I love that they have a history and were touched by a stranger’s hands.

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19.February.2016

So beautiful! Thanks for the inspiration!

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19.February.2016

Beautiful! Simple but just gorgeous! Plus your photos are always stunning!

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replied on February 19th, 2016

I wish you could see them in real life! The photos really don’t do them justice.

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19.February.2016

I LOVE the size! I hate tons of small fillers. Large pieces look so streamlined! Now real question time. Do you ever worry about stinky odors from vintage cloth items? I am a bit nervous. Some items are costly (mainly rugs) and I dread the smell.

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replied on February 19th, 2016

No, I don’t really worry about odors from vintage textiles. A few of the kilim rugs I’ve ordered had a faint “old” smell when they arrived. I just vacuumed them with a little baking soda and aired them out outside for a few days and they were fine. No lingering odors!

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19.February.2016

Dana, have you ever shared anything about your bathroom door?! It’s amazing!!

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replied on February 19th, 2016

We replaced all the interior doors in our home during renovations. (We actually lived without interior doors for a while. It was very dicey. Not recommended!) They were affordable at $85 a pop. You can read more about them here…

http://www.housetweaking.com/2012/07/05/hold-the-door/

…and here…

http://www.housetweaking.com/2013/10/15/a-date-with-my-doors/

Hope that helps!

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19.February.2016

Kuba cloth + that bathroom rug = perfection!

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19.February.2016

they look amazing! Like super expensive pieces of art. well done!

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replied on February 19th, 2016

Thank you!

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19.February.2016

These textile pieces are sooo beautiful. Love!

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19.February.2016

Love them and their large size! And I’m looking forward to seeing Everett’s framed artwork!

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19.February.2016

First, THANK YOU, I am glad to know I’m not the only one who uses the bathroom door open due to littles. The one time I tried to, about 3 years ago, there was an explosion of 10 lbs of flour in the mudroom.

The art looks amazing! Beautiful frames!

Side note: my mother had a pair of molas given to her by a cousin who was stationed in Panama (this was in the 70s). I was promised they would be mine after their most recent move, but…the moving truck caught on fire and the molas didn’t make it. I should check Etsy for vintage molas, or hell, even new ones. Fabric art is wonderful, isn’t it?

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replied on February 19th, 2016

The moving truck caught on fire?! So sad. Fabric art might be my favorite.

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replied on February 19th, 2016

Yes, the moving truck caught on fire. The insurance company thinks somebody had tried to rob the truck while smoking (it was on the moving company’s lot), and an ash caught on something. They lost “only” 90% of their belongings (better than 100%), and some things in the truck weren’t accounted for after the fire. For example, there was absolutely no evidence of any bicycles, even though a frame would make it through a fire, there was no china, and some other items. In the end, it has been a mixed bag for them: they no longer have decades worth of stuff, but they also have no family photos (our baby books and family photos are GONE) and other mementos that are actually worth keeping. It’s a good reminder that stuff is fleeting.

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replied on February 20th, 2016

That’s the worst moving story ever. Way to find the silver lining though. I guess it would make purging easier?

19.February.2016

Such a great idea. Your home is beautiful!

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replied on February 19th, 2016

Thanks Megan!

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19.February.2016

OMG!!! I just LOVE THEM!! They are perfect in that spot! I would steal them for my own, but my hubby’s taste doesn’t jive. :( I will have to live vicariously through you.

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19.February.2016

hi Dana!

This is a little off topic, but the photo of your bathroom reminded me of a question I had! My husband and I are installing new tile in one of our bathrooms ( it has carerra countertops), and we are considering black hex. My husband is reluctant though, because he thinks it will show dust/hair/dirt faster than a white hex for example.

So my question is, what’s your experience after living with black hex for awhile now? Would you do it again?

Thanks! Love your blog by the way! :-)

Keely

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replied on February 20th, 2016

So we have black hex in the main bathroom and light gray-blue penny tile in the master bathroom. The penny tile is the one that shows EVERYTHING. It’s lighter and glossy so every hair (we’re all brunettes though) is noticeable. Our bathrooms don’t get too dusty. I have to clean them regularly (kids) plus I keep the heating/cooling vents closed in the bathrooms because they get hot/cold very quickly. Forced air and dust aren’t blowing around all the time since I keep them closed. I absolutely LOVE the black hex. It’s surprisingly easy to clean and maintain. (I just use Honest’s bathroom cleaner.) The matte finish is really forgiving. I don’t think it would be as easy to live with if the grout were white. (Our grout is a light gray.) By far, the black hex is my favorite flooring in our entire home. It was a pain to install but so, so worth it. If we ever have the chance to renovate another house, matte black tile (maybe hex, maybe another shape) in the bathrooms will be on my wish list.

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19.February.2016

I like the way you went large and low. They look great! Have a good weekend. :)

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19.February.2016

Hi, I was curious about your hallway lighting. You mentioned offset lighting and I’ve never heard that term before. I was intently inspecting each of your photos above but cannot see the lighting. Can you explain? Thanks.

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replied on February 20th, 2016

If you click the “ideas for the hallway” link within the post, you can see photos of the offset lighting. Basically, the overhead recessed lighting is positioned so that it washes expanses of wall. The lights aren’t lined up down the center of the hallway. They are offset to either side a little. Our electrician (my cousin-in-law) recommended this setup to wash the walls in light for better illumination versus just shining straight down on the floor. It’s also great for highlighting any artwork that ends up on the walls. It’s such a small tweak but makes a huge difference in the hallway at night. It’s really beautiful all lit up.

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19.February.2016

Your design style is really starting to border on genius. I never would have seen these and imagined them displayed in this way. And they look SO COOL and sophisticated!

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replied on February 20th, 2016

That’s so nice of you to say. Have you read Elizabeth Gilbert’s new book, Big Magic? It’s all about creative living and she talks about her belief that a person isn’t a genius per se but HAS a genius helping them along the way. I’m not really into mystical thinking but it’s an interesting concept. Anyway, your comment made me think of it. Thanks for reading!

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19.February.2016

New viewer here—-love your aesthetic and what you’ve done with your home AND your writing. Fun and *now* finding it addictive to read and look. Looking forward to more !!

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20.February.2016

Finally making a comment! I enjoy seeing your pictures and savour all the details. Question – what is the paint colour in the hall and is that the same colour on either side of your fireplace? Many thanks for the inspiration you provide.

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replied on February 20th, 2016

The wall paint color is Benjamin Moore tapestry beige. Horrible name, wonderful hue. And yes, it’s the same color on either side of the fireplace. I like that it’s light and airy but totally livable with dirty hands constantly touching the walls. I love white walls but I find them difficult to live with in common areas. In person, they can feel a little sterile (especially in the winter here) and they show every little fingerprint and smudge. The tapestry beige is really soft and provides just enough contrast against the white trim to keep things interesting.

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20.February.2016

Hi Dana. This is a really cool look, thanks for sharing. I went to the etsy shop & was curious did you buy two Kuba cloths or just one and cut it to have two pieces to frame? Also, I would love to know some of you favorite etsy sellers that you have purchased from. I like etsy but it can be overwhelming to me! Thanks.

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replied on February 20th, 2016

The pair was sold as a pair, two separate cloths. I used to share my favorite etsy shops every now and then. Maybe I need to bring those posts back?! I would love to.

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20.February.2016

That looks really beautiful. They go perfectly there.

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20.February.2016

I feel your plaster pain! Both of our houses have been plaster walled and I hated having to use the toggle bolts and other anchors that needed big holes in the wall! Enter the Walldog! It’s amazing. It’s a screw and anchor in one. I’ve used it for art work, shelves and heavy mirrors without a problem! I love them sooooo much. You can find them at Ace/Lowes/Home Depot but her is a link.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000RUNEDS/ref=pd_aw_sim_sbs_60_3/188-9887141-0261930?ie=UTF8&dpID=51cMIflk8qL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL100_SR100%2C70_&refRID=01S0MRG2ZFY4RJS0KGXE

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replied on February 22nd, 2016

Thanks for sharing the link!

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replied on March 2nd, 2016

totally going to check out that walldog thing. dana, do you use masonry anchors specifcally for all plaster walls? or only plaster bordering on exterior walls? please clear it up for me-i suffer from the plaster walls too!

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20.February.2016

So beautiful-well done! I just love showcasing fabric as art and you chose such a great placement, it’s the kind of thing that will make you want to linger just to gaze upon it :) I also really enjoyed the different angles of your home in those shots.
I was curious about the lighting too and followed the link you mentioned to Karen above, which was helpful. Funny that a couple of weeks ago I remembered the post you did last year about Filter Easy (which was also the lighting post) and came here to get the info and your coupon offer is still valid (well it was when I used it 2 weeks ago anyway) my first FREE filters showed up the other day, so thank you, Dana! I could not believe how nasty our old filters were when I pulled them out. Gross. We totally needed this service.
Also, please bring back etsy favs. Am I the only person who reads all the reader comments?

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replied on February 22nd, 2016

So glad you were able to take advantage of the discount!

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22.February.2016

Love your house! Is the rug in the bathroom vintage? How does it stand up to wet feet/moisture? I’d love a vintage rug for our kid’s bathroom (we have a very similar style bathroom to yours) but worry about it getting moldy? Thanks!

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replied on February 22nd, 2016

The rug is vintage (from eBay). The low pile means the bathroom door can be opened / closed easily without getting caught on the rug. I’ve had it in the bathroom for over a year now with no issues whatsoever. I take it outside for a good shaking every now and then and I’ve even hosed it down once or twice. During renovations, we vented the bathroom fans to the exterior (previously, they vented into the attic) and we run them whenever someone takes a bath or shower and for ~20 minutes afterwards. We don’t use the rug as a bath mat. We usually dry off before stepping out of the tub or shower or I place a foot towel on the floor for the younger kids. We’ve never had any problems with excess moisture or mold. Hope that helps!

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22.February.2016

Love the art! Looks great in that spot! On a different note, what kind of runner is that in the hallway and where did you get it….I think I love it and need one for my hallway. Thanks!

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replied on February 22nd, 2016

It’s a seagrass runner from Overstock. You can read a little more about it here…

http://www.housetweaking.com/2014/07/14/rug-gripper-in-the-hallway/

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22.February.2016

Hi Dana,
I’ve been a long time reader of your blog, but have never commented. But, I have to say, I love your style and your home is so beautiful. I am really considering decorating my space more like yours. I have been doing the same decorating for years, but your blog has inspired me to take the steps to donate some of my stuff and start fresh. Thank you!

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replied on February 23rd, 2016

Thanks for reading and commenting, Nikki! If you get rid of just one thing you don’t really like in favor of one thing you love, my work here is done :)

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24.February.2016

You take so much care when it comes to stuff like this. All this work for some picture frames. You make me feel so so lazy lol.

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replied on February 24th, 2016

It was really easy! Promise.

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27.February.2016

gorgeous and unique. i love that they are totally interesting without a ton of pattern or color.

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14.March.2016

What are the approximate dimensions of your frames? I have a similar hallway spaces I’ve been wanting to do something with and I like that your prints truly make a ‘statement’ – just want to see if something similar would be feasible in my space. Thank you!

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replied on March 14th, 2016

The frames measure ~30″ x 30″.

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18.October.2016

Just wondering, I am planned no on framing a Kuba cloth too, is your cloth touching the glass frame or is there space between the fabric and glass? Is there any issue with the glass touching the fabric? TIA!

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replied on October 19th, 2016

Our framed mudcloth pieces do not touch the glass. I don’t think it would hurt the fabric to touch the glass, but it might look flattened or squished in places if it did. I like seeing the wrinkles and natural texture without it being pushed up against the glass.

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