...because home doesn't happen overnight.

My boys start school next week so we’re squeezing in a few more fun things before summer break is officially over. As a result, things might be quieter on the blog over the next week. I hope you understand. The good news is that once school starts, my afternoons are freed up for more projects. My goal is to finish tweaking the boys’ room by the end of the month. The last time I shared my sluggish progress in the room, I got a ton of questions regarding the hanging plant(er). I thought I would give it a quick mention today since there was so much interest.

burro's tail 1

The boys requested a “cool plant” for their room. I decided a hanging plant would work best to keep floor space open for play. I stumbled across a sprawling burro’s tail at a local nursery. (Berns nursery in Beavercreek for any locals.) It came in a plastic hanging planter from the nursery but I wanted to dress it up a little.

I found the modern macrame planter on etsy. (I’ll take one of everything in that shop, btw.) Then I returned to my local nursery and found the cracked, glazed pot. To allow for proper drainage, I kept the burro’s tail in its original plastic pot and dropped it into the glazed one. (The glazed pot doesn’t have drainage holes.)

To hang the planter, I installed a toggle ceiling hook. After eyeballing where I wanted the planter to hang, I drilled a pilot hole in the ceiling then inserted and screwed in the hook. I don’t remember the weight capacity but it’s well above that of the planter. My one suggestion for ceiling hooks is to match them to your ceiling so they aren’t an eyesore. The one I used is white and it blends into the ceiling.

I carefully slipped the pot into the macrame planter and arranged the stems then suspended the entire thing from the ceiling hook. The length of the macrame hanger is perfect for standard 8′ ceilings. One thing to be aware of: the plant is delicate and if you manhandle it, it will drop its fleshy leaves. It drops a few leaves each week but they’re super small and non-toxic. I just pick them up when I see them or vacuum them during weekly cleanings.

burro's tail 2

Burro’s tail (a.k.a. donkey’s tail or lamb’s tail) is a succulent and it likes sun, rocky soil and infrequent watering. I hung it in front of an east-facing window and water it every 2-3 weeks. It’s been going strong for over two months. I think I can keep it alive! I love all the different textures going on in this planter and I adore the simple macrame hanger with its natural wood beads. It’s got me scheming for more hanging planters in the house. In the living room? My bedroom?

engineer print frame and mat

And while I’m thinking of it, I added a mat to the framed engineer print. You might remember my conundrum with the $3 engineer print being a few inches too short to fill the entire poster frame. Since this piece will be a mainstay in the room for years to come (I’m going switch out the engineer print each year for a current candid of the boys), I felt like it was worthy investment. It definitely gives the inexpensive, black and white print a polished look. I’m really happy with it!

burro's tail 3

I have a few more fun ideas to bring to life in this room. In fact, today the boys and I picked up samples for the next big project. Can’t wait to share!

images: Dana Miller for House*Tweaking

engineer print trend 4

Framed engineer prints are everywhere. Have you seen them? I especially love the ones featured here, here and here. I had been looking for a large piece of artwork to hang in the boys’ room when it dawned on me that an engineer print might be the ticket.

I had taken a photo with my phone of Layne and Everett on our recent trip to Florida. They’re mid-air jumping into a pool and it just exudes BOY. I had the photo blown up into a 2′ x 3′ black and white engineer print at Staples. (I quickly ordered the print online.) One day and $3 later, I had the print in hand. Since the print was so inexpensive, I “splurged” on a wood poster frame.

The print isn’t the highest quality and the paper is thin but for $3 I wasn’t expecting perfection. Also, the image doesn’t fill out the entire 3′ length – it’s more like 32″. This probably has something to do with the fact that I took the photo using the VSCO app. I might DIY a mat but next time I want the image to fill the entire frame. The frame itself is nice for a poster frame. The wood gives it a more expensive look and the facing is acrylic (not glass) which is ideal for a kids’ room.

engineer print trend 3

Layne and Everett LOVE it and that’s all that matters anyway. The plan is to switch out the print for a current photo of the boys each year. I really like the idea of this being a feature that evolves as the boys grow. And at $3 per print, we can afford to change the imagery whenever boredom strikes.

Have you tried enlarging a candid photo into an engineer print yet? It’s so easy and inexpensive and instantly adds personality to any space.

images: Dana Miller for House*Tweaking

06.23.14 / DIY Bullseye Art

Things are moving right along in the boys’ bedroom.

Currently, this lil’ corner of their room is a new family favorite. Layne requested the reading chair. I added a vintage ottoman and dresser (off to the side) for added comfort and storage, respectively. With the major furniture pieces in place, I’ve turned my attention to accessories and art. Ever since Apartment Therapy featured this home tour, I’ve been itching to DIY some bullseye art and this corner seemed like the perfect place for it.

glidden DIY

With the help of Glidden® paint, I was able to pull it off. Here’s what I did:

bullseye DIY

1 – I used a square canvas (found in my attic) and two quarts of Glidden paint in blue-grey and fire engine red. First, I painted the entire canvas a warm white that I already had on had. This step is the secret to achieving nice smooth curves in the final product so don’t skip it! (You can easily touch up stray brushstrokes with the white paint later on.) I let the white paint dry completely.

2 – I found the center of the canvas then used a pencil to trace a large pot lid right in the center. This would later become the inner curve of the outermost bullseye ring. I determined how thick I wanted my outer ring then cut a length of string accordingly and tied one end to my pencil and the other end to the handle of the pot lid. Holding the lid in place, I carefully drew a larger circle around the pot lid. I had my outer bullseye ring.

3 – For the inner bullseye, I traced around a small glass container in the center of the canvas.

4 – My pencil lines were faint which made them easy to edit and also easy to paint over.

5 – Working from the center out, I painted the canvas using foam brushes and a steady hand. I gave the center bullseye and outer ring two coats of paint each. After the paint dried for 30-60 minutes, I went back with the white paint used in step #1 to touch up any brushstrokes that inevitably made their way out of the lines.

DIY bullseye art via House*Tweaking

I decided to frame the canvas with inexpensive wood trim. I left the wood unfinished for a casual look. I think the thin frame is the perfect touch!

DIY bullseye art via House*Tweaking

Glidden paint made it easy to finally turn my inspiration into reality. The boys LOVE the bullseye art! They keep telling me how cool it is. I think the bullseye is a great symbol to use in a boy’s room without feeling too theme-y. What do you think?

FYI – Disclosure: This post was sponsored by Glidden paint through their partnership with POPSUGAR Select. While I was compensated to write about Glidden paint, all opinions are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands that support this blog!

images: Dana Miller for House*Tweaking

DIY dream catcher 7

Today I’m shooting the front entry for the reveal which will be featured later this month or early next. Over the weekend I had fun creating some hanging art for the entry. Wall hangings / fiber art / hanging art…whatever you prefer to call ‘em…are super hot right now. I thought something on a smaller scale would dress up the non-existent entry. (It’s just a door that opens into the living room.) I didn’t follow any DIY’s but, instead, made things up as I went. As mentioned in a previous post, this was my inspiration. Here’s what went down.

DIY dream catcher supplies

First, I gathered supplies. I picked up three gold rings (6″- 5″- 3″), leather lace and five wooden beads at JoAnn’s for less than $8. I had white string on hand which I found in the garage. (I think it’s for gardening?) The only tools required were my gold scissors and hands.

DIY dream catcher 2

1 – I tied the gold rings together with a strip of leather lace.

2 – I cut twenty-two strands of 24″ long string. Then I folded one 24″ string in half and looped it around the smallest gold ring so the cut ends were furthest from the ring.

3 – I pulled the loose ends of the string through the loop…

4 – …and continued pulling until the string was tightly secured around the ring.

5 – One by one, I added all twenty-two strings to the 3″ ring.

6 – I threaded five wooden beads onto the strings and knotted them in place at varying heights to create a “V” shape. (Each bead is threaded onto to two loose string ends which are knotted.)

DIY dream catcher 3

I hung the entire piece on a hook to trim the strings into a “V” shape that corresponded with the placement of the beads. (Be careful not to cut the strings holding beads above the beads!)

DIY dream catcher 4

I added another loop of leather lace at the top to display the hanging art on some wood knobs near the front door. Ta-da! This project was super easy, super cheap.

DIY dream catcher 5

I especially love the fact that this hanging art incorporates four of my favorite things: gold, white, leather and wood. I like to think of it as a modern day dream catcher and I associate the five wooden beads with my family of five. It’s a stretch and I’m nuts, I know.

DIY dream catcher 6

Steve got a kick out of watching me DIY the hanging art.

“Are you making earrings?”

“It’s like bling for the entry.”

“I’ve got some ideas for post titles: DIY Dangly Balls, Hang Your Balls at the Door and (my personal favorite) Nothing Says Welcome Home Like My Balls.”

I could go on and on. We were both in tears by the time it was all said and done. Our sixteen-year-old sense of humor has saved our marriage more than once. Laughter is good.

Anyhow, there’s a snippet of the entry. I can’t wait to show you the rest! It’s nothing over the top but it’s functional and stylish which is really all I need it to be.

Now, tell me. What are your title ideas for this post? Have fun with it. My sixteen-year-old sense of humor won’t judge.

images: Dana Miller for House*Tweaking