...because home doesn't happen overnight.

Truth: We juice. As in fruit and vegetables. {Or is it fruits and vegetables? Ah. Irrelevant.} After watching the compelling documentaries, Fat Sick & Nearly Dead and Food Matters, earlier this year HH and I were inspired to start juicing. Neither one of us was looking to lose weight or cure disease {which juicing can do}, we were simply hoping to optimize our physical and mental health, be proactive, prevent disease and set a good example for our kids.

One thing I always had a hard time with in my past job as a retail pharmacist was regularly getting asked by obviously unhealthy customers with nothing in their grocery cart but sugary drinks and packaged foods, “What’s best for {insert ailment, symptom, disease, complaint here}?” The answer I wanted to give wasn’t the answer they were looking for. What I really wanted to say was, “Go put everything in your shopping cart back on the shelf. Then head to the produce section and fill ‘er up. When you get home, go for a walk. That’s the best thing.” It would have been a good start and I probably would have been fired on the spot. Our society is funny like that.

After a little research, HH purchased the 8004 Omega juicer.

That was six months ago and we’ve been giving our juicer a run for its money ever since. We juice once in the morning most days of the week. We both feel good about getting in a bunch of healthy stuff at the beginning of the day so even if we don’t do a great job eating right the rest of the day, at least we started the day right. Hey. We’re not perfect. And Thanksgiving {a.k.a. the day we show our gratefulness by indulging in gluttony…what’s up with that?} was just last week so this post is rather timely, isn’t it?

Anyhow, I’ve been receiving more and more questions about our juicing experience so I thought a little how-we-do-it post was in order. Be warned: we’re not professional juicers. If there is such a thing. We could be doing a lot better and we hope to continue to improve upon our juicing experience now that we’ve made it a part of our lives and are committed to it.

We have a few juicing staples that are included in every juice we make: kale, spinach, carrots. Other produce we use and move in and out  of rotation are: celery, cucumbers, melons, pineapple, apples, tomatoes and whatever else is getting a little too ripe in our fridge.

Per the first image of this post, the end of our island across from the fridge is our juicing command station. It looks intense but it takes less than a minute to set up the juicer. Before beginning to juice, I cut up anything that’s too large to fit into the juicer. Basically, anything larger than ~1½” in diameter gets cut down to fit in the shoot.

Then I turn on the juicer and load the produce into the top. The juicer comes with a nifty handheld plunger to push the food down into the juicing chamber. We’ve discovered that starting with softer things {like the leafy veggies, cucumber, pineapple and tomatoes in this example} and ending with harder produce {here, the carrots} works best to extract the most juice possible. The firmer produce sort of cleans out the juicer.

There are two tubs under the juicer to catch the juice and pulp. This is what the extracted juice looks like after some spinach leaves make their way through the juicer.

This is what the spinach pulp looks like at the end of the juicer. It crazy how dry the pulp is. Nearly all of the juice is gone.

Here’s where I started adding the carrots. You can see how the juice and pulp change color as I add different foods.

Everett LOVES helping with the plunger and asks, “Can I be your squisher?” every morning. It’s so easy a four-year-old can do it!

Look at that pretty pulp.

The juicer does make some noise but it’s nothing loud. We’ve yet to have anything get stuck. There’s a reverse switch in case that happens.

On this particular day, I was juicing just for this post so I didn’t make a full batch. The juicer can handle much more. We drink up as soon as the juice is ready.

{Everett was still in his ‘army’ pajamas.}

Layne and Everett drink the juice too – albeit smaller servings. When we first started juicing, we paid the boys 25¢ for each glass of juice they drank. Bribery. We do it. A month into it, though, we let the pay slide and the boys still drank the juice so we no longer have to bribe them. I did buy some stainless steel straws that seem to make the juice more palatable for the kids. For particularly ‘robust’ batches, we’ll add some ice cubes for the boys too.

How does the juice taste? Well, it depends on the ingredients. It helps to have a little sweetness in there to balance out all the green so that’s why I include pineapple, apple, honeydew, cantaloupe or watermelon. Does it taste like fried chicken or chocolate cupcakes? No. But it doesn’t taste like poop either. {Not that I know what poop tastes like.} Now that we’ve been juicing for several months, I actually crave the juice but not in the way that I crave tasty foods. I don’t crave the taste. I crave the effect. It’s difficult to explain. My body craves it as opposed to my taste buds craving it. It’s weird.

And the juice is actually filling. Not in a way that makes my pants feel tight around the waist but in a way that leaves me satisfied until late morning.

To clean up, I dismantle the juicer and rinse all the parts. {As of right now, the pulp gets trashed but it would be great to compost.} Then everything minus the actual juicer goes in the dishwasher on the top rack. Yes, there are a lot of parts. Eight to be exact. But that comes with the juicing territory I guess.

The juicer gets prime real estate in a drawer close to the sink since we use it so often. As far as kitchen utensils go, the juicer is heavy {~20 lbs} and it’s easier not to store it up high.

So, yeah, I spend the majority of my grocery shopping time in the produce section and I usually have to buy fresh produce twice a week. I’ll be honest. {This is Honest Monday after all.} When we first started looking into juicing, trekking to the grocery store more than once a week sounded like a pain. Now that we’ve been doing it for a while, it’s just become a part of life. We buy organic whenever possible. Yes, it’s more expensive. But it’s our health! When you compare the cost of a trip to the doctor/emergency room/hospital/pharmacy to the cost of a few pounds of produce…well, I think you know which costs more in the end. Plus, my skin has never looked so good! And my skin used to be infamous for acne breakouts. Hell. Now that I’ve just celebrated a birthday and I’m officially in my mid-30’s, I’ll gladly pay a little more at the grocery store to reap beauty benefits.

In the Food Matters documentary, one of the speakers made a comment about our society having things backwards. We gladly stretch our pursestrings for a nice big house but complain about the cost of healthy food. Where are our priorities? This whole downsizing adventure is looking better and better every day.

As I mentioned, we’d love to improve our juicing experience. Adding in some wheat grass and spirulina is next on our list. What about you? Have you ever juiced? Any recipes you want to share? Do you have a juice bar in your city? HH and I have casually thrown around the idea of opening a juice bar. We’d offer organic produce from local farmers and let customers gather their ingredients into a basket then we’d juice it for them OR they could order from a simple juice menu. And I think there should be a drive-thru. There aren’t enough healthy drive-thru options out there.

One thing is for sure. I haven’t thrown out overripe produce in months. I’m not above juicing wilted lettuce or mushy strawberries. I’ll juice anything.

FYI – I wasn’t compensated for mentioning any of the products above. I’m just sharing our juicy experience!

images: Dana Miller for House*Tweaking

85 Comments

26.November.2012

I love juicing too! It is amazing how much better I feel doing it (and I can tell, because I became lazy for a spell and didn’t juice for awhile, and I could definitely tell a difference). I have tried all sorts of different recipes, but my absolute favorite is: kale, spinach, green apple, cucumber and lemon- yum!

And you are right about the skin- juicing made a huge difference to mine too!

Buying a good quality juicer is a must- I have an Omega as well, and you definitely get what you pay for- I feed my pulp to our chickens (I have just 7) – they love it!

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26.November.2012

i juice, too.
every day.
LOVE it.
i also do green smoothies.
this recipe is awesome ♥

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26.November.2012

Hi Dana! This is the first time I’ve commented here. :)

Yes, our little family juices. Much the same ingredients you posted about (I’m also not above juicing mushy/wilted foods). We have been doing it on and off for a few years and I definitely feel much better when I juice or drink green smoothies than when I don’t.

When I was pregnant, I was very ill (hyperemesis gravidarum) and I found fresh vege juice was one of the few things I could stomach and hold down the whole 9 months.

Now my daughter Anouk is almost 11 months and she drinks juices too! Mostly the vegetable ones as I am cautious about too much sugar at such a young age. It’s great for both of us as we’re vegetarians (some fish sometimes) and I feel as though we’re getting a really good dose of what we may miss from meat.

Really enjoying your blog! Luna U. :)

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26.November.2012

Love your blog – you can use the pulp to make a great moist cake (look up carrot cake recipes etc…)
and also if you add mashed avocado, garlic and lemon juice to some of the pulp it makes a nice sandwich spread.

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26.November.2012

We are devotees to Apple, carrot, celery, beetroot and ginger juices – it has cured hubby’s irritable bowel and we rarely get colds anymore.

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26.November.2012

I’m not a juicer, but I cook a lot and use lots of fresh produce. One thing that I have thought of doing is to join a local Community Supported Agriculture. The ones in my area allow you to select a basket/box size based on your needs or household size and some of them offer an organic option. It may be something to consider to get fresh local fruits and veggies, and often it can be less pricey than buying at the grocery store.

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replied on November 26th, 2012

The great thing about juicing is that you don’t cook anything and the produce retains all those beneficial nutrients. Other than washing and cutting up a few things, there’s little prep involved.

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26.November.2012

I love the effects of juicing too! My favorite is kale, cucumber, celery, spinach, apple, lemon and I always include ginger. Haven’t been sick in a long time!

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26.November.2012

We started juicing this year. It was really nice in the summer when our garden was plentiful. One of my favorite recipes is a knock-off from a local juice bar: Green Apple “Skin Nourisher” – apple, cucumber, celery and (tiny bit of ) lemon. My other favorite is one I only grab at the juice bar. I can’t get it to taste like theirs! Hot Pink- beet, apple, pineapple and ginger. My husband doesn’t care for this one, but I love tomatoes so I usually throw in tomatoes, celery, carrot, cucumber, basil, and a splash of vinegar.

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replied on November 26th, 2012

Oh yes! I forgot to mention beets. Love them in juices and they turn them a beautiful color.

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26.November.2012

My mom would make carrot cake with the pulp from the carrots. It’s delicious and she’d put the pulp to good use!

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26.November.2012

A healthy drive-through option would be awesome in my town. Also a drive-through coffee place. Can’t believe we don’t have one (in a college town- come on, university peeps need their caffeine!). So if you ever start that juicing business and want to expand to Charlottesville, Virginia, I think you’d have plenty of customers.

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26.November.2012

That was truly an honest post ;) A juicer is definitely the next thing on our list to purchase. I’ve always found it interesting how little North Americans spend on food when compared to Europeans and people in most other parts of the world. We seem to place very little value on the quality of our food, and then wonder why we’re so sick. Like you said, juicing and buying organic isn’t cheap, but it’s your health, and staying healthy is cheap!

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26.November.2012

Love this post! For years I thought I wanted a juicer, but never wanted to spend the money so I’d throw all the ingredients into my blender instead. Now I’m glad I do it because I get all the fiber and nutrients left behind in the pulp. I’ve juice before at a friends house and felt guilty throwing away all the left over pulp :(. I have felt a huge difference in my moods, skin and health since I make fruit and veggie smoothies. It really is amazing what healthy eating can do for you!

Thank for honest Mondays!

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replied on November 26th, 2012

Juicing on an empty stomach first thing in the morning gives your body a concentrated jolt of vitamins and minerals that are absorbed quickly into the bloodstream. Smoothies are definitely a healthy option too but take more time to digest and are a good mid-day option.

Yay for healthy drinking!!

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replied on November 26th, 2012

Thanks for the juicer vs. smoothie breakdown! I always wondered what made juicing more beneficial than just eating the fruit or blending it up in a smoothie for an afternoon snack.

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26.November.2012

P.s. Dr. Oz has many blender smoothies on his website that are tasty and easy for anyone who didn’t know :).

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26.November.2012

You definitely have me motivated to start juicing now! A few questions however. Does the juice serve as your entire breakfast meal for both you and HH, or do you supplement with something in addition? Any tips on storing all of the fresh produce?

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replied on November 26th, 2012

Juicing doesn’t replace meals for us. Rather, we do it in addition to our regular eating habits. For breakfast, we’ll usually have a glass of juice with an egg later on.

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26.November.2012

This is a bad option for the carbohydrate intolerant. What may be healthy for one is not healthy for another.

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replied on November 26th, 2012

I’m not sure I follow. Juicing first thing in the morning on an empty stomach – the best time to consume juice! – provides your body with a jolt of concentrated vitamins, minerals and nutrients. Fiber definitely has a place in our diet and juicing does not take the place of that. Why not save the leftover pulp from juicing for a fiber-rich smoothie later on in the day?

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replied on November 26th, 2012

I love me some sugar… but there are people who have something called dumping syndrome. which is exactly what it sounds like. eat too much sugar (even natural sugar is sugar) and everything comes out the other end. like, now. not pretty……

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replied on November 27th, 2012

Why not juice veggies with a low sugar content then?

replied on November 26th, 2012

I get you, Alison. Some of my family members are diabetic, and fruits are full of carbs. A higher proportion of veggies to fruits could work.

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26.November.2012

I also have an Omega, and don’t use it enough. You post has inspired me to get into my juicing! I am now 30 and have found that I am at that stage in life when exercise and healthy eating needs to become a priority, genetics isn’t enough like it is in your 20’s. :(

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26.November.2012

This was fun to read. I was curious if you considered a Vitamix when you were shopping? Wouldn’t it be beneficial to eat the pulp goodies along with the juice? We need to eat more veggies in my house, so I am seriously considering getting one. Thanks for the info and encouragement by sharing your healthy habit!

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26.November.2012

I remember when you talked about using the Ninja for smoothies. . so I’m guessing you are doing juicing instead now? Also wondering why you went the juice extractor route instead of a powerful blender route? Wouldn’t it be better to drink/eat the pulp in your juice rather than throwing it away? There have to be a bunch of vitamins still in the pulp. I’ve been tossing around the idea of getting a good blender (omni/blendtec/vitamix) for months.

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replied on November 26th, 2012

I still make smoothies – though not as often. Juicing isn’t replacing anything for us. Rather, we’re using it in addition to our regular diet.

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replied on November 27th, 2012

From what I’ve read, both juicing and blending are good options and they each have their advantages. From the juicing perspective, our juicer runs at very low rpm’s. It slowly crushes out all the liquid, leaving all the fiber behind. This allows you to pack even more nutrients into a single glass and makes absorption much easier. It also introduces very little oxidation when compared to a high rpm blender. Oxidation ultimately starts to degrade nutritional value. Google “juicing vs blending”, there’s a lot of information out there.

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26.November.2012

Thanks for sharing! I’ve been looking into juicing since I read Kimberly Snyder’s book, The Beauty Detox. She recommended those same documentaries you mentioned. I might have to take the plunge into juicing!

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26.November.2012

I just watched Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead last week! So inspiring. I started juicing about 2 years ago, but switched to a VitaMix about 6 months ago. I don’t like how much a juicer wastes. I put chia seeds and flax seeds in my drinks, and greek yogurt, and have a smoothie for breakfast everyday. I use a mix of fruits and veggies.

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26.November.2012

I have (possibly a stupid) question. What is the difference between making a green smoothie in a blender and juicing?

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replied on November 26th, 2012

With juicing, you are able to consume the nutrients of the food in a concentrated form. You could make smoothies using all of the same ingredients but would have to drink a lot more to get the same amount of nutrients.

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26.November.2012

having never juiced before, i have always wondered what happens to all the pulp? it seems like a LOT of waste if it isn’t used somehow!

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replied on November 26th, 2012

There are recipes out there for the pulp although I’ve never tried them. I’d like to start composting next spring so whatever doesn’t make it into a recipe will get composted.

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replied on November 27th, 2012

I was admiring all the pulp and imagining all the great vegetable stock that could be made. I love the idea of using it for a fiber rich smoothie or a cake (carrot, zucchini, etc.) This was a fabulous post! Thank you for writing it.

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26.November.2012

Thank you for the great post on healthy eating. I work for a pharmacy franchise office in Canada and am the daughter of a pharmacist who owned his own independent community pharmacy. I grew up listening to my dad tell his patients that they needed to get exercise, eat healthy and lose weight. He pulled no punches, but people in the community loved him and respected him. And some even listened to him. We ate like a typical family in the 1970s and 1980s, with a bit of convenience food especially treats, but my parents both grew up in families that lived on farms, so I was used to scratch cooking. When my son was born, my husband an I committed to being a good example for him. We eat supper as a family every night of the week and while we do have some convenience food on occasion, we find that when we eat it, we end up feeling kind of gross afterward. We’ve had many nights where we looked at each other and said, “Well, that’s the LAST TIME we eat THAT!”

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26.November.2012

I love fresh juices as a treat but only as a treat every now and then. Removing the pulp and fiber is so unhealthy especially from high sugar fruits and veggies like carrots. Without the fiber you’re getting high blood sugar spikes which is unhealthy for everybody but especially dangerous for diabetics. Since most diets lack enough fiber removing fiber through juicing is also counterproductive especially when you need that fiber to combat diseases like colon cancer.

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replied on November 26th, 2012

Juiced fruits and veggies – even those considered to have a high sugar content – actually contain vitamins, minerals and enzymes that aid digestion, lower insulin resistance and improve glucose metabolism naturally. All great benefits for diabetics! Removing fiber via juicing doesn’t mean you are removing all fiber from your diet. In fact, pulp leftover from juicing can be used to make fiber-rich smoothies later on in the day if desired.

You’re right in saying diabetics need to consider which foods they juice BUT I would hope that diabetics aren’t deterred from juicing. Instead they can pay attention to which foods they juice – just like they pay attention to which foods they consume – and continue to monitor their blood glucose. Common sense for any diabetic. To miss out on the amazing benefits of juicing due to fear would be a shame.

Like I mentioned in previous comments, we don’t juice to replace meals but use it to supplement our regular diet.

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replied on November 26th, 2012

I agree that juicing is a fun add on to eating whole fruits and vegetables but juicing for a lot of people is a big negative. The blood sugar spikes are still going to be there no matter the vitamins and minerals. Fiber is needed to slow down sugar absortion. Remove the fiber and you’re consuming straight up fructose which is transformed into triglycerides in the liver. We all know how bad triglycerides are.

There’s a reason why the Mayo clinic, the American cancer and heart societies recommend caution with juicing. Whole is best but if you do juice I would recommend monitoring your fiber intake through a program myfitnesspal just to make sure you’re getting enough to prevent real diseases like colon cancer and heart disease.

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replied on November 27th, 2012

Why not juice veggies with low sugar content then? – in addition to a healthy diet full of whole foods and fiber. Our medical society makes recommendations based on scientific studies. Unfortunately, no pharmaceutical company has funded {hmmmm, wonder why?} a concrete study on the effects of juicing.

replied on November 27th, 2012

I’m having trouble finding references for the concentrated nutrients claim, and this one. I haven’t tried very hard yet, but do you have some to get me started? My project for the evening will be writing it up for you.

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replied on November 27th, 2012

OK, I give up, I can’t find anything at all. This may be a multi-part comment, sorry.

There are several questions that need to be answered to see if the juicing claims are true. I think evetyone would agree that getting more fruit and veg is a good thing and would make most people feel better. There is definitely evidence that juice is more calorie dense than puree, and has less fibre. But there are a lot of unanswered questions.

Firstly, is there a difference in nutrient concentrations between pureed and juiced foods? I can’t even find that information. Livestrong has a summary of some fruits and fruit juices, but it’s from the USDA, and the juices are commercial. There’s no info on veg juices that aren’t canned or blended. Livestrong is also comparing a cup of juice to a cup of fruit pieces, which is less densly packed.

Secondly, how bioavailable are the nutrients (apart from sugar and fibre) in puree vs juice? I can’t find any data. Lots of claims, no data.

Thirdly, next comment

replied on November 27th, 2012

Why all of a sudden is this a juice vs. puree post? I’m sorry if it came across that way. That wasn’t my intention. I was solely sharing how we have ADDED juicing to our regular eating habits. Again, juicing is not replacing anything for us. We still eat balanced meals and some snacks when we feel hungry. We still take multivitamins. We still exercise. We still drink water. We still make smoothies sometimes as well.

replied on November 27th, 2012

So we know that fresh veggies and fruit contain nutrients beneficial to our bodies. Right? I’m no dictionary but I think the definition of ‘concentration’ has something to do with the abundance of an ingredient per volume of the whole. If I have a large pile of veggies and then extract the pulp, I’m left with the same abundance of nutrients but in a much smaller volume than I started with. So, my juice is more concentrated than the big ol’ pile of food – meaning I can consume a smaller volume but still get the same # of nutrients.

If you are wanting a clinical study looking at the long-term effects of juicing, you aren’t going to find one. No big pharmaceutical companies will fund one.

replied on November 27th, 2012

Thirdly, what are the benefits of the nutrients in the fruit and veg. Which ones are easy to get enough of, and which harder? Which ones are deficient in the average person’s diet? This one is very individual.

You can make an assessment based on macronutrients, for which we do have data (fibre, protein, carbohydrates, fats). I, for example, need to eat more fibre and fewer calories. For an overweight person like me, you want the longest satiety for your calories. I gave no problems eating enough volume of food through the day…to get more fruit and veg I can swap them with bread or pasta. A quick shot of sugar and vitamins which leaves me hungry ten miutes later is counterproductive. With a puree (smoothie) I can also add protein to keep me full longer or a vegetarian who has issues getting enough zinc can add nuts to the smoothie. But for a person with problems getting enough calories or digesting fibrous foods then it’s better to juice because you get the nutrients and the calories without the bulk.

But without knowing exactly what micronutrients are in juiced vegetables you can’t make any claims about them. And it’s not as simple as saying the water carries all of the vitamins out of the pulp. Not all micronutrients are water soluble, some are membrane bound and will stay with the pulp, not all will be soluble at neutral pH and not all the cells will be disrupted by the juicer. Teeth plus stomach plus acid plus bile will extract a different profile of chemicals from the pulp.

In summary: no evidence regarding micronutrients, for macronutrients the majority of first world people will be better off pureeing (smoothie).

Off for a glass of Zeigler’s cider now, LOL

replied on November 27th, 2012

It doesn’t need to be funded by big pharma, it wouldn’t be expensive. All you need is a mass spec to measure concentrations. The manufacturers of the machines could do it, or someone with a university lab and an undergrad student looking for a project.

As I explained in the comment I cross posted with yours, it is not a given that the concentration of a molecule will be higher in the extracted water. The concentration of lignin probably isn’t.

And it’s pretty disingenuous of you to pretend to not know what concentration means. You have a degree in pharmacology, don’t you? Is this a message board point scoring snarkfest or adults rationally and scientifically evaluating claims?

replied on November 27th, 2012

It would be great if it were funded by the pharmaceutical or collegiate community! Then that would rule out bias against results obtained by juice machine/blender manufacturers. I’m with you. Juicing and/or blending won’t get you 100% of the nutrients from the whole food. To do that, you’d have to eat the food right out of the ground or right off the plant. Lots of things can degrade the quality of our food so it’s not 100% when we buy it at the grocery store/farmer’s market. But that doesn’t mean I’m going to avoid it.

I would not sit down and eat all the food that I normally juice in the morning. In fact, I probably wouldn’t drink all of it in a smoothie either. I usually juice about 7 cups of whole food when I juice. Juicing makes nutrients readily available to my body with out fiber slowing absorption. Again, why can’t we juice and smoothie too? They have different purposes.

replied on November 27th, 2012

Ugh, sorry, massive long serial comments, but I’m really interested in this question tonight. I was thinking about membrane bound proteins and the role of these micronutrients in the cells and what that means for where you’d find them. And it occurred to me that you can clearly see you haven’t got all the beta carotene out of the carrot because the pulp is still orange. Considering there’s only 1mg/100g more beta carotene in tinned juice than in cooked carrot, if the ratio is the same for raw carrot, then if a person decides to add three carrots a day to their diet they’re better off pureeing them than juicing them, becase then they’ll get all the beta carotene rather than only a fraction, as with juicing.

replied on November 28th, 2012

You have to remember that the absorption of beta carotene occurs solely in the small intestine and is affected by other factors. Juicing may not get 100% of the whole food beta carotene into your body but its delivery to the small intestine is exceptional. Why not use the leftover carrot pulp in a smoothie?

Between you and me, we’d drain these veggies and fruit of all their nutrients. Ha!

replied on November 27th, 2012

Sorry, it just seemed like you were making a claim over and over, a claim to which many of us instinctively responded “but the fibre! The blood sugar spike!” and I wondered what the facts really were. If you’re not interested in discussing it, that’s fine, but I thought it was an interesting question, which should have a simple factual answer. It turns out that if the information is out there I can’t find it, and I thought that you, as a pharmacist, might have references I can’t find, or, one of your readers might also find it interesting and be able to find something. And I mean that, I’m not being Minnesota passive aggressive.

replied on November 27th, 2012

I’m actually not a practicing pharmacist anymore. And pharmacists don’t have special access to studies. They’re available to anyone who wants to look/pay for them. I wish there was a simple answer!

26.November.2012

Ever try amazing grass Superfood? I always add it to my smoothies or even mix it in yogurt – has a great taste and it adds the benefits of wheatgrass, etc:

http://amazinggrass.com/index.php?p=view_category&category_id=16&option_27=Berry#simple_filter

I’ve only tried the berry flavored – i’ve bought it on amazon, and Whole Foods carries it as well.

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26.November.2012

Thanks much for this post; it was probably the reminder and prod we need to stop talking about getting a juicer “someday” and do it. Thanks also to all the posters who shared their favorite combinations of foods to juice. (I’m impressed that your boys now drink juiced fruit-veggie combos without bribes!)

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26.November.2012

Don’t feel badly about paying your boys to drink the juice. If you paid it before they drank, it was a bribe. But if they were paid afterwards, it was a reward!

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replied on November 27th, 2012

Good point!

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26.November.2012

I agree that there is not enough healthy food drive-thru options. I would LOVE to drive through somewhere and get a good quality salad. I’d gladly pay $9 for one. Maybe you guys could be the trend setters!

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26.November.2012

Can you make a larger batch of juice and keep it stored in the fridge? I’d love to try juicing but I cannot see myself pulling that sucker out, chopping, and cleaning it multiple times a week. Once or twice a week, sure! If it can be pre-made and last a few days, something’s going on my list for Santa!

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replied on November 27th, 2012

No, you’d quickly lose flavor and vitamins through oxidation. Commercial juices have techniques to keep their products from oxidising.

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replied on November 27th, 2012

The juice is best when consumed immediately. Otherwise, it quickly loses its nutritional value.

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26.November.2012

Did you see west elm bedding is on sale? I know you have been looking for bedding.

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26.November.2012

Yep…my MIL bakes with the pulp as well. She freezes the pulp and adds it to quick breads…calls it “trash” bread. ha

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26.November.2012

I have PCOS and watch my carb intake, but I have taken a nutrition class and KNOW that there are tons of vegetables that are not heavy in carbs/starches. So, I agree that this could definitely be an option for someone with diabetes or insulin resistance, you would just have to monitor the varieties of veggies you are using and sparingly use the fruits. In saying that, I have never juiced, but the idea is very intriguing to me. For someone exploring or just wanting more information on it, do you have a good reference for beginners?

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26.November.2012

Thanks for sharing. We have the same juicer and we LOVE it!

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27.November.2012

This post totally inspired me yesterday to purchase a Vitamix from Costco, and I already have made two smoothies and soup with it, on top of eating more fruits and vegetables than I have in probably the last month combined! I just gave birth 5 weeks ago so I’m really hoping this will help me in getting to my Pre pregnancy weight.

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27.November.2012

I juiced once and to be honest I didn’t like the clean up portion. So many parts….So, I got the Vitamix! Love, love that thing. I use the same EXACT ingredients as you do and it feels like drinking juice and the whole thing gets used. Whenever I get into it, my skin glows, I feel fantastic, and I feel so calm and clear throughout the day. And the clean up? Piece of cake! Just a rinse immediately after use and you’re good, or fill it with water and a drop of dish soap and give it a whirl. Presto! Done. My 7 year old likes drinks ‘em and I even have served it to her friends and they like it to! One friend of mine saw that her daughter drank a green smoothie I made and went out and got a Vitamix! You’d think I work for this company! I don’t. But I’m such a stong believer in all the benefits it provides. And you can make other stuff , which I do. Like homemade made peanut butter, soup, hummus, and so much more! By the way, I got mine at Costco and it seems to be the best price around. Thank you for your fabulous blog!

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27.November.2012

If you’re making smoothies with water, is there an enormous difference (nutritionally) in terms of how your body is processing and using the food?

What’s your take on packaged unpasteurized fruit and veggie juices in moderation for those who don’t have the time or equipment to juice? (e.g., http://www.bolthouse.com/product/tropicalcarrot)

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27.November.2012

Hi there,

Love your blog! Have you ever thought about joining a CSA (Community-Supported Agriculture)? We joined one in podunk SC, so I’m sure you guys have one! We get a laundry basket full of fresh fruits and veggies each week for $15!! We couldn’t get that much produce at the store for a fourth of the cost! If you haven’t looked into it, I highly recommend it! We’re eating more fruits and vegetables than ever before, and have so much more variety in our diet! Before anyone asks, it’s not organic, but neither is the stuff we buy at Bi-Lo!

xo,

Jess

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28.November.2012

Nice! I’ve thought about these for a long time, and I totally agree that nutrition is way overlooked as a big piece of well being.

A friend who is into juicing uses her pulp to make grain-free veggie crackers. Just spread thinly on a sheet or on parchment, and bake crisp.

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28.November.2012

Thanks for posting this! I recently started juicing too and I feel great. I know exactly what you mean about your body craving it, when I go a few days without I notice a big change. I feel like it really improved my mood too – is that weird? My friends thought i was crazy at first but guess what’s on their christmas list now? So happy to see more people getting into it.

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30.November.2012

Quick random question – how do the metal straws help? Do they make it taste better? also do you ever add fruit?

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replied on November 30th, 2012

I think just straws in general help. My kids always drink more through straws. Not sure why??? After realizing what a waste disposable straws are I found some reusable stainless steel ones and I love them!

We do add fruit – usually a melon or apple – but try to keep the majority of the juice veggie.

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30.November.2012

Holy cow at the comments! Came here after seeing your Instagram. I was raised raw vegan via the hallelujah diet way back when even being a vegetarian needed explanation, let alone vegan which most people had never heard of. You are SPOT on juicing first thing in the morning gives your more vitamins than most people consume in a week. personally, I wouldn’t drink fruit juice, but I know it makes some veggies more palatable. Anyone who is doing anything to attempt better health, eating raw veggies, smoothies, cooking with veggies instead of the typical American diet deserves an applause, there will always be a “better” way according to so and so. But any steps away from the Standard American Diet is a step in the right direction, and the haters probably ARE drinking coffee and eating donuts right now. “Name” if you want to eat 8 cups of purée a day…go for it, but I have a feeling you don’t and won’t. ; )

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30.November.2012

I love watching food documentaries. Food Matters is great. I also loved “Forks over Knives” and “Food Inc.”. They’ve really made an impact on me.

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01.December.2012

Well HT, I have admired you for many reasons before but your patience in this comment section is commendable! Fireworks!! I saw the instagram reference and came over to check it out. Have you ever juiced sweet potatoes? High sugar content but very delicious.

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05.December.2012

I have to admit, the clean-up intimidates me. Our dishwasher is circa 1974 and is on its last legs. It just sort of evenly distributes the filth. So maybe once we replace that, we’ll take a look at juicing.

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I’ve been mulling your post over since I read it a few days ago, and recently came across this link that suggests things to do with the leftover pulp: http://www.fitsugar.com/What-Do-Leftover-Juice-Pulp-21518042. I would definitely advocate compost, too! We use the heck out of our compost each year in our spring garden. Love that stuff.

I, too, admire your patience with the comments section. Who knew juicing could be such a controversial topic?

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09.December.2012

Thanks so much for all this information! My hubby and I are buying a juicer as our joint Christmas present to each other this year! So glad to have your honest opinion on what works for your family!

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Yowza on the comments! I just ordered a juicer last night and thought I remembered a post of yours on the topic. Fingers crossed that I can get my son to drink the juice. Thanks for sharing your juicing experience. :)

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24.January.2013

hi dana,
i have a centrifugal juicer that i have been using for years and was looking into the masticating juicers as they seem to reap more benefits.
one thing i am curious about though, is the time?
any reading i have done says that the masticating juicers are slower.
i’m curious as to how long it takes you to whip up a tall glass of juice as i juice in the morning before work and am limited in the fruits and veggies i can juice (no berries, leafy greens or grapes)
any insight would help.
thanks!

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replied on January 24th, 2013

Setting up the juicer, prep {washing and/or cutting produce} and juicing takes about 10-15 minutes. We make enough juice for two large glasses {mine & HH’s} and two small glasses {the kids’}. Cleanup takes another few minutes which consists of disassembling the juicer, rinsing all parts and loading into the dishwasher.

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replied on January 24th, 2013

hmmm… that doesn’t sound like that much more time. it’s always so hard to tell though.
thanks for the insight. i think my next one will likely be a masticating juicer!

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30.April.2013

I recently started juicing and for me reducing my fiber but increasing my nutritional content is important. I have gastroparesis (a disorder of the stomach were I dont make the necessary contractions to break up and pass food) because of this I need to have less fiber but still want to be able to get the nutrients from fruits and veggies. Juicing allows me to do just that. I still have fiber in my diet but if I were to eat as many fruits and veggies as I can drink I would be really sick all the time. I have the Omega as well and really love what I have been able to do with it.

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18.May.2013

Hubby and I have been juicing for five days now, we each have lost 9lbs already! Plus I feel great! I didn’t read the other posts so I apologize if this is a repeat but I wanted to let you know about the website Joe created after his documentary, fat, sick and nearly dead, on there he has tons of recipes, helpful tips, nutritional information and plans to follow if you are interested in rebooting your body kind of like a detox or cleanse.
http://www.rebootwithjoe.com/
I highly recommend everyone who has or hasn’t seen the documentary to check out this site.
I also wanted to add after doing research before we purchased a juicer we decided on purchasing the masticating juicer rather then a Centrifugal Juicer. Yes it does take a bit more time to prep and clean afterwards but the benefits make it worth it. The fact that you can get more nutrition from what your juicing because it’s slower it creates less oxygen in the juice. The more oxygen in the juice it can deplete the nutrients. Also it juices greens very well! One flaw I’ve noticed is that when you juice berries you won’t get much juice from them unless you alternate between veggies and berries. The pulp from the veggies slows the juicer down to allow more juice from berries to be strained out while the veggie pulp is being pushed out.
Thank you for posting this I really enjoyed reading it :)

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26.August.2014

I know I’m commenting nearly two years after the original post, but I have to admit I’ve spent the last two days reading your blog backwards. {blog-stalker alert! j/k}Anywhoo – I’m curious if you have ever/are familiar with juicing with cooked fruits and veggies? Sounds completely wacky, I know – but I have this strange allergy called Oral-Allergy-Syndrome (OAS) where I can’t eat un-cooked fruits or vegetables. Some are worse (or more deadly…think aniphylactic shock) than others. I tolerate grapes and berries a little better and only get a slightly itchy mouth and throat. Tomatoes and anything that has touched an uncooked cut tomato could kill me! I know that cooking everything takes a lot of the nutrients out but it’s the only way I can attempt to enjoy some of the things “normal” people do. I make gazpacho but I cook everything first. I grill peaches. I steam or roast veggies until they are just barely cooked so I can trick myself into thinking the *snap* of a green bean or carrot is the real raw thing. I WANT to try juicing but no one in their right mind has done so with cooked things so it’s hard to tell if it’s for me or if I should just give up on being healthy :/

Thanks for sharing!

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